Sweeney Coat of Arms Parchment

Regular price €175.00
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Your Irish Family Coat Of Arms

Created by Edmond McGrath (RIP) in the 1970s, these Irish prints were rediscovered in 2020 after 40 years in safe storage. Beautifully arranged in this Irish coat of arms parchment is an artistic celebration of the Sweeney Irish surname. The Sweeney Irish family crest is illustrated at the center and surrounded by famous Celtic symbols of Ireland. These illustrations are a wonderful dedication to Irish last names.

Imagine having this beautiful story of your name hanging on your living room wall for all to study over a glass of wine, or to take a glimpse at it when having your Barry's tea on the couch. There is so much to take in. This parchment is an heirloom for many generations yet to come. It's a wonderful reminder of your Irish heritage.

On your living room wall, you will always be reminded of your Irish origins and it will be a show stopper for visiting friends and family. Presenting a family coat of arms gift is a truly special gift for the home for someone special who has that unique Irish connection.

On this parchment, the Killarney lakes take center stage above the heraldic shield whilst many Irish Celtic symbols and famous monuments surround it.

Illustrated in this parchment are:

  • Book of Kells inspired artwork
  • St.Patrick
  • The Cross of Cong
  • The Ardagh Chalice
  • Killarney Lakes
  • The Irish Harp
  • The Currachs of the West of Ireland
  • Glendalough Monastery
  • Blarney Castle
  • Traditional thatched houses of Ireland
  • Ahenny Cross
  • Cross of Muiredach
  • The Burgh O’Malley Chalice
  • The crests of the four provinces of Ireland: Ulster, Connaught, Leinster, Munster
  • The Tara Brooch
  • The Celtic Torc 

The Sweeney Coat Of Arms Story

Read the intriguing transcription of the text illustrated on the Sweeney parchment:

The name in Irish is Mac Suibhne and the ancestor from whom the name is taken was Suibhne O’Neill, a chieftain in Argle, Scotland. It is not until 1267 that they occur in the ‘Annals of Connaught’ with a recording of the death of Murrough McSweeney, grandson of Suibhne. By the fourteenth century they had established themselves as three great septs or clans in Tirconnell, Donegal. These wer McSweeney Fanad, McSweeney Banagh and McSweeney na Dtuath. Na Dtuath literally means ‘of the districts’ but the latter group were commonly known as McSweeney of the Battleaxes. Murrough McSweeney was the first of the renowned McSweeney gallowglasses whose standard weapon was the great Scandinavian axe. This word ‘Galloglaigh’ meaning foreign soldiers, is used to describe the mercenary troops who were imported at the time, frequenty from Scotland, to provide the permanent figh ting forces maintained by powerful Irish chiefs. Often from the Hebrides and a mixed Gaelic and Norse descent, their fighting skills made them the backbone of every Irish army from the thirteenth to the sixteenth century. In 1500 a branch of the McSweeney Fanad migrated to Munster were they followed their occupation under the McCarthys and established their own land and castles in Muskerry. The name is in fact more frequently found in Cork and Kerry than it is in Ulster. Predictably, many McSweeneys figured in Irish military history, not least in the times when many of them had to seek service with continental forces. When James II’s army was fighting in the Ireland there were eleven called McSweeney with him. The prefix ‘Mac’ disappeared in the period of Gaelic suppression and, unlike other names, has not generally been revived.

 

Four Options For You:

Print: Print shipped to your home.

Framed Print: Framed print shipped to your home

Unlimited Print Download: An ideal option if you would like your extended family to each have one.

Unique Original Parchment: If you would like to be the proud holder of the one and only original parchment for this name, you can purchase this pending availability.

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