Scanlon Coat of Arms Parchment

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Your Irish Family Coat Of Arms

Created by Edmond McGrath (RIP) in the 1970s, these Irish prints were rediscovered in 2020 after 40 years in safe storage. Beautifully arranged in this Irish coat of arms parchment is an artistic celebration of the Scanlon Irish surname. The Scanlon Irish family crest is illustrated at the center and surrounded by famous Celtic symbols of Ireland. These illustrations are a wonderful dedication to Irish last names.

Imagine having this beautiful story of your name hanging on your living room wall for all to study over a glass of wine, or to take a glimpse at it when having your Barry's tea on the couch. There is so much to take in. This parchment is an heirloom for many generations yet to come. It's a wonderful reminder of your Irish heritage.

On your living room wall, you will always be reminded of your Irish origins and it will be a show stopper for visiting friends and family. Presenting a family coat of arms gift is a truly special gift for the home for someone special who has that unique Irish connection.

On this parchment, the Killarney lakes take center stage above the heraldic shield whilst many Irish Celtic symbols and famous monuments surround it.

Illustrated in this parchment are:

  • Book of Kells inspired artwork
  • St.Patrick
  • The Cross of Cong
  • The Ardagh Chalice
  • Killarney Lakes
  • The Irish Harp
  • The Currachs of the West of Ireland
  • Glendalough Monastery
  • Blarney Castle
  • Traditional thatched houses of Ireland
  • Ahenny Cross
  • Cross of Muiredach
  • The Burgh O’Malley Chalice
  • The crests of the four provinces of Ireland: Ulster, Connaught, Leinster, Munster
  • The Tara Brooch
  • The Celtic Torc 

The Scanlon Coat Of Arms Story

Read the intriguing transcription of the text illustrated on the Scanlon parchment:

From the evidence of place names and old census returns it seems that the name of Scanlan is now carried by descendants of at least two and probably three quite separate septs or clans. They are concentrated now in the counties of Kerry, Limerick and Cork which were part of the ancient kingdom of Munster. The original form of the name there was O’Scannlain, unlike the branch from Louth, who were known as McScannlain. Both forms have now disappeared.  There are a number of place names which derive from the Scanlans including six Ballyscanlans, a Scanlansland and a Scanlan's Island. From the incidence of these in Co. Clare and Mayo it seems likely that there was also a third group in North Connaught, Clare and Sligo record the second largest number of Scanlans, which is borne out by the fact that in 1659 the greatest number of O’Scannells and O’Scanlans lived in those areas. It is interesting to see that O’Scannell, the rarer version of the name, common in the north, has now been partly absorbed by the more usual form of Scanlan and the McScanlans of Ulster and Leinster seem to have almost disappeared. It seems as if at one time the forms were used concurrently. In the 13th century the Most Rev. Patrick O'Scanlan, Bishop of Raphoe and later Archbishop of Armagh, was also known as O’Scannell.  More recently the Scanlans have been represented in the church by Dr. Lawrence Scanlan who, as a Bishop of Salt Lake Cley was particularlt adept at establishing good relations with the Mormons. Also in America a number of Scanlans became authors and song writers. But due to the passing of time and mis-spelling, variations of the name occur, including O’Scanlan, Scanlan and Scanlon.

 

Four Options For You:

Print: Print shipped to your home.

Framed Print: Framed print shipped to your home

Unlimited Print Download: An ideal option if you would like your extended family to each have one.

Unique Original Parchment: If you would like to be the proud holder of the one and only original parchment for this name, you can purchase this pending availability.

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